Author Archives: Matt Borondy

Thelonious Monk, Neil Gaiman, Neal Stephenson

I’ve been taking my time through the Thelonious Monk Reader. Took it out from the MIT library and realized, hey, why would I ever buy old books again?I’m also reading Smoke and Mirrors, Neil Gaiman’s short story collection. And also Neal Stephenson’s ginormous book Anathem, which honestly I can’t imagine finishing–turns out I’m not so […]

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Here’s Looking at You, Susan Sontag, Words Without Borders

The February edition of Words Without Borders is online (theme: graphic novels).Here’s Looking at You: Robert Birnbaum does his TMN digest thing with Jonathan Baumbach’s You: Or The Invention of Memory.“Sontag: The Precocious Years”: Luc Sante reviews Reborn: Journals and Notebooks 1947-1963, a collection of entries from Susan Sontag with an intro by her son, […]

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Should Dean replace Daschle? Facebook says yes, The Nation not so sure

Now that Tom Daschle and his funny red glasses have been jettisoned from consideration for the Obama administration’s Secretary of Health and Human Services position, a logical replacement seems to be the passionate former Vermont governor (and physician) Howard Dean. In fact, the Facebook group “Appoint Howard Dean to HHS” has, as of this writing, […]

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Monday’s Margins: Narrative Mag, Soft Skull, Kyle Minor, & more

Maud Newton interviews Narrative Magazine editor Tom Jenks about the journal’s dual presence in print and electronic media as well as its popularity on Amazon’s Kindle. Happily, Soft Skull/Counterpoint Press reported its best year ever.Kyle Minor and Kathleen Rooney’s “Live Nude Girl in the Devil’s Territory” Book Tour is kicking off this week.At the Boston […]

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Too Big to Fail, Too Big to Jail?

Should the Obama administration prosecute the Bush administration for violating up to 269 national and international laws (you know little things like torture, wiretapping and “extraordinary rendition”)? Amy Goodman’s new article in the San Francisco Chronicle investigates the possibilities and wonders whether Obama’s claims of an “open government” will usher in an era of accountability […]

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R.I.P. John Updike and the WaPo Book World

Today there are two big stories circulating the lit-blog universe: John Updike is dead, and so is, according to rumor, the Washington Post Book World.We’re having some really bad weather up here in the northeast, so Birnbaum’s long-awaited talk with Lawrence Weschler has also been killed. However, Birnbaum recommends you check out Weschler’s chat with […]

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KAKUTANI: From Books, New President Found Voice

I’ve been slowly reading the two books written by Barack Obama (Dreams from my Father and The Audacity of Hope) for the past year or so, impressed by the depth of his experience and thinking. In a recent NY Times article, Michiko Kakutani discusses how reading shaped Obama’s life and how the new president discovered […]

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The New President’s Agenda

Now that Barack Obama has been sworn in and the transition away from George W. Bush’s rule is complete, whitehouse.gov also got a makeover. You can read the new administration’s agenda, check out his briefing room (which includes a blog, news on appoinments and exective orders), and of course learn about the history of the […]

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Christian Bauman’s Eternal Playlist

Novelist Christian Bauman, author of In Hoboken (and Identity Theory contributing editor), makes an appearance on the NY Times book blog today as part of its “Living with Music” feature. As a former musician/songwriter/folksinger whose latest novel depicts the life of struggling young Jersey musicians, Bauman offers a playlist of acoustic artists for whom he […]

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Doctors Without Borders’ "Top Ten Humanitarian Crises of 2008"

Doctors Without Borders (MSF) released its “Top Ten Humanitarian Crises of 2008” this week. The crises include:1. Somalia’s Humanitarian Catastrophe Worsens2. Critical Health Needs in Myanmar Remain Unmet3. Health Crisis Sweeps Zimbabwe as Violence and Economic Collapse Spread4. Civilians Trapped as War Rages in Eastern Congo5. Millions of Malnourished Children Left Untreated Despite Advances in […]

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Heaven-Sent Friends, Parisians, Countrymen

My fellow Cedarville (Ohio) High School graduate, J. Saunders Elmore, will be releasing his debut novel, The Amateur American, this summer. Crown is publishing the book, which apparently a mystery/thriller about “a young American expatriate in France who is drawn into a web of violent political intrigue, corruption and murder when he takes a job […]

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Antosca’s second novel out next month

This just in regarding Identity Theory contributor Nick Antosca:Punk rock-spirited independent publisher Word Riot Press will release Nick Antosca’s second novel, Midnight Picnic, on Dec. 15.Midnight Picnic was slated to be released by Impetus Press on Oct. 31. The book’s publication was put on hold when Impetus Press publishers Willy Blackmore and Jennifer Banash announced […]

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PEN World Voices, Amy Goodman

PEN World Voices coverage at Metaxu Cafe comes from several different bloggers lucky enough to be in New York City this week.Words Without Borders has several events there. (We had been meaning to link you to WWB for a while, though they’re not exactly underground.)We’re hoping to get our literary-event fix this weekend in Burlington, […]

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When Sonny Bravo Met Holden Caulfield

Spurred by what one critic said of Dagoberto Gilb’s The Flowers (that its narrator Sonny Bravo could be Holden Caulfield), I read The Flowers then reread Salinger’s Catcher in the Rye. The narrators do share the word “phony,” it’s true. Rather than interchange them, I’d like to see them meet.Finished a novel that debuted in […]

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Rereading Steinbeck

I’m rereading everything Steinbeck for my 11th grade English class (The Pearl, Of Mice and Men, and The Grapes of Wrath).For fun I’ve got Not Quite What I Was Planning: Six-Word Memoirs and Veronica by Mary Gaitskill (I adore her). -Sarah Presite, assistant fiction editor

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