InvisiblePeople.tv Puts a Face on Homelessness

Elvin from InvisiblePeople.tv on Vimeo.

The video above is about Elvin, a healthcare professional who has worked as a nurse for more than 20 years and also holds a degree in political science. He has been married for 25 years and has three children.

As InvisiblePeople.tv writes: “Elvin sounds like someone you’d meet at a baseball game or a coffee shop, but I met Elvin in a parking lot in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. He has been homeless and living under a bridge for over a year. He’s working to renew his nursing license so he can go back to work. He says it’s hard to keep your dignity when you’re living on the streets without a home of your own. He is hopeful that his children will learn from his experience.”

These stories and more are featured almost every other day on the vlog InvisiblePeople.tv. They are captured by Mark Horvath, who was at one point homeless himself. He writes:

“For years I’ve used the lens of a television camera to tell the stories of homelessness and the organizations trying to help. That was part of my job. The reports were produced well and told a story, but the stories you see on this site are much different. These are the real people, telling their own, very real stories… unedited, uncensored and raw.

The purpose of this vlog is to make the invisible visible. I hope these people and their stories connect with you and don’t let go. I hope their conversations with me will start a conversation in your circle of friends.”


Visit his vlog today.
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  • Karen

    The amount of people that face homelessness in the United States is astonishing. The way that Mr. Horvath captures the stories of these people who undergo such struggles is admirable and inspiring. His work is appreciated. More people should give due attention to hard working people such as Elvin. We all need help sometimes, and only together we will truly achieve social justice!

  • Captain Australia

    In Australia, we don't have such a severe problem with homelessness. Our social welfare system is somewhat stronger, but slowly becoming Americanised.

    (Funny, Americanised in that context seems to be a synonym for flushing down the toilet?)

    I'd love to help the homeless, if I were fabulously wealthy, I'd live anonymously amongst the homeless and target individuals for rescue – use my wealth to help them with education, residences .. there are few things finer in life than a second chance.