Author Archives: Robert Birnbaum

Robert Birnbaum

Robert Birnbaum’s Social Security number ends in 2247. He lives in zip code 02465 and area code 617. He was born in the 2nd month of a year in the 20th century. He doesn’t social network (used as a verb) except through his Cuban retriever Beny (named after Beny More, the Frank Sinatra of Cuba). Izzy Birnbaum also has cloud storage and uses electronic mail. He hopes his son Cuba is the second coming of Pudge Rodriguez. He mutters to himself at Our Man In Boston. E-mail: duendepublishing@gmail.com

Make America Read Again

The True Flag book

Sadly, the news cycle has been laden with reports and opinings relating to the nightmare Bedlamite regime that hastens over the American Empire.

Posted in Infostream | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

How The Light Gets In

Gordon Parks I Am You

The times are about to get darker—which calls for resistance and well-conceived dissidence.

Posted in Infostream | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Allow Me To Introduce Myself

The Man Who Loved Dogs

Skillful and tasteful aggregation has great utility in this overabundance.

Posted in Infostream | Tagged , , , , | 1 Response

Interview: Celeste Ng, Author of Everything I Never Told You

Novelist Celeste Ng

“Creating some kind of art…is as close to leaving your brain behind in a jar as you’re going to get.”

Posted in Author Interviews | Tagged , , , , , , , | 10 Responses

Interview: Benjamin Anastas, Author of Too Good to Be True

Ben Anastas author photo

“There is a strange and abiding prestige, a strange and abiding cultural juice that comes from being a writer. Having seen the reality of it, it doesn’t make a whole lot of sense to me.”

Posted in Author Interviews | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Interview: John H. Summers on The Baffler

John H Summers

Historian and publisher of the renascent Baffler magazine, John H. Summers has not exactly taken a direct route to heading a publication whose significance he compares to Dwight Macdonald’s mid-century journal, Politics.

Posted in Author Interviews, Social Justice Interviews | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Pete Hamill

Self-described “aging Celtic scribe” Pete Hamill is, in the argot of our time, an old-school journalist and writer. Born in Brooklyn during the 20th century’s Great Depression, he was a high school dropout whose first interests were in the visual arts.

Posted in Author Interviews | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Daniel Okrent

daniel okrent

Diligently and exhaustively researched, Okrent’s Last Call makes clear the numerous and varied parts to the complex story of America’s “noble experiment” to outlaw the sale, manufacture and transportation of alcoholic beverages.

Posted in Author Interviews | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Paul Krassner

Paul Krassner

Had he only published his gadfly magazine, The Realist, he would be worthy of high praise and attention, but Krassner continues to ply his subversion in books and other places.

Posted in Author Interviews | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Robert Stone on Damascus Gate

Robert Stone

It’s highly unlikely that if you are reading this you are unaware (or unappreciative) of American novelist Robert Stone. For what it’s worth, I rank Stone among a handful of living great American writers and have hungrily seized opportunities to chat with him.

Posted in Author Interviews | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Birnbaum’s reading list: Blake Bailey’s bios, Canadian writer Joseph Boyden, and more

I have read neither Richard Yates nor John Cheever’s writings, but I have enjoyed Blake Bailey’s bios–first of Yates and now John Cheever.

Posted in What We're Reading | Tagged , , | 2 Responses

Howard Zinn on A People’s History of American Empire

Howard Zinn

Zinn talks about whether he has changed his views and shares his thoughts on the upcoming election and the newly published graphic/comic A People’s History of American Empire.

Posted in Author Interviews, Social Justice Interviews | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Dagoberto Gilb on The Flowers

Dagoberto Gilb

Gilb’s most recent opus, The Flowers, is set in an LA-like metropolis at a time not unlike the ’90s when riots overwhelmed that city.

Posted in Author Interviews | Tagged , | Leave a comment

The Perfect Man, by Naeem Murr

Legendary American xenophobia (or possibly indifference) to the world that exists beyond American shores is, with all deliberate speed, being eroded by the rise of a kind of hyphenate American literature.

Posted in Book Rate | Tagged | Leave a comment

Later, at the Bar, by Rebecca Barry

Rebecca Barry, an Ohio State University MFA who has published both fiction and nonfiction in many of the right places, debuts with a “novel in stories.”

Posted in Book Rate | Tagged , | Leave a comment